Harness high-efficiency LEDs to create the perfect feel for any space

The Department of Energy projects that by the year 2027, LEDs could result in nationwide savings of $30 billion, making them a practical, energy-saving option for both residential and commercial buildings. With a multitude of color and hue-levels ranging from warm to daylight, people can lower their electricity bills and energy use without sacrificing the lighting elements that make their homes and properties comfortable, inviting, and productive.

Many LEDs also support control features that can be used to manage illumination. As one example, the Philips Hue system includes countless color-changing options, enabling users to set “scenes” with their lighting. They can take or upload a picture and select a color scheme for their lights to mimic. Peripheral apps can be used to complement the Hue's capabilities — for instance, allowing a homeowner or business owner to synchronize lighting with music.

CEE lighting program manager Jamie Fitzke says consumers can find LEDs that are compatible with home voice services and phone apps too. “For example, with one lighting brand you can turn your lights on and off from any location as long as you're connected to Wi-Fi. You can also dim your lights with your phone without needing to change your toggle switch to a dimmer.” LEDs use 75 percent less energy, last 25 times longer than incandescent bulbs, and emit less heat; regular light bulbs release 90 percent of their energy as heat.

When it comes to designing the mood and feel of a space with lighting, it’s essential to set specific illumination and warmth levels, and LEDs provide plenty of choices. Lighting “color temperature” is measured in Kelvin (abbreviated as “K”), a unit of measurement for absolute temperature. Hue levels of 2000K to 3000K produce warm light, ranging from orange to yellow-white. At the other end of the spectrum, 3100K to 4500K levels result in cool-white to bright-white light; anything above this level will emit a blue-white light.

Here are a few tips for using warmth levels to create a specific feel:


Intimate & cozy: Warm (a soft, dim glow of light; often yellow in appearance): 2000K-3000K levels are best for creating an intimate and cozy feel in a room. Perfect for living rooms, bedrooms, and kitchens, as well as restaurants and commercial spaces in need of ambient light.  
 
Bright & vibrant: Cool-white (bright, vibrant light): 3100K-4500K levels are ideal in spaces where bright, vibrant light is needed, including bathrooms, basements, offices, and garages.   
 
Crisp, invigorating light: Daylight (blue-white light): 4600K-6500K levels are great in spaces where crisp white light is needed, such as display areas. This level also works well as security lighting and task lighting.
 
If you’re looking to save money and energy while reducing your environmental footprint and personalizing your space, LEDs are a smart choice with (literally!) millions of shades to explore.

 

To learn more about energy efficient solutions for your home, business, or community visit https://www.mncee.org/

Read the original post at https://www.mncee.org/blog/january-2018/harness-high-efficiency-led...

 

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Tags: LEDs, efficient, energy

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Comment by Eric Fulda on April 6, 2018 at 2:50pm

After 25 (1982-2003) year in the EE lighting business, I always suggested customers buy a few extras and write the installation date on the bulb or retrofit can or fixture, followed by making photocopy or scan of the purchase receipt AND WARRANTY. If only for curiosity, its good to know how long the lamps lasted. I'm just now starting to change the mini spirals on my homes exterior decorative lantern fixtures after 15 years and my sloped ceiling R30 recessed cans are starting to go too. When the price of bulbs was $5 to $15 this made a lot of sense, but with the improved performance and unit cost reduction its more for curiosity. If your installing lamps in a customers home I suggest ALWAYS buy a few spares for each location, such as vanity or recessed etc. This could save you or the customer the time and expense of making a trip to the lighting department and teaches your customer how to maintain their system. Be sure and mark the boxes per location if possible. Todays LED lamps are really amazing, considering when and where the CFL industry started back in the mid 80's.    

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