We just had 2 mini split air conditioners put in our home, which previously did not have air conditioning.  We have ceiling fans in every room and I am wondering how to use the fans in conjunction with the air conditioners that are at ceiling level.  Should the fans be on summer mode?  What speed is good to use to enhance the distribution of the cool air in the rooms?  

We usually keep the fans on high to keep the air moving, but with the air conditioners, I am not sure if the warm air near the ceiling is making the compressors work more.  

Any advice out there?

Thanks.

Beverly

Views: 1354

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Good opinions in these replies!  I'll just add a few:

* Experiment.  It's your house and how you feel in it should drive your decisions.  If it was my house, I'd start by turning the fans off.

* There is no "best way" to go.  We don't know the size of your rooms, the layout, the insulation levels, your building airtightness, or even what climate you're in.  So all we can do is guess.

* In some of the climates where I live, ceiling fans are very helpful for moving air around, which helps avoid stale pockets, which can help keep mold at bay.  It's not just a comfort thing.

Good luck,

Blake

Thanks.  A very reasonable, practical answer.  We have done our experimenting and ceiling fans, on low, seem to make us comfortable.  

Ceiling Fans vs. Air Conditioning.

Though installing numerous ceiling fans in your hope may be the cheaper option, it’s clear that air conditioning works in ways they just can’t match on a fundamental level. Air conditioning, while more expensive, just works. It has the ability to adjust the temperature of the air in your home to a cooler level and create a comfortable environment. Ceiling fans, on the other hand, simply circulate air. This air cools the skin, which can help your body to cool itself, but it doesn’t have a cooling effect on the room or house.

If you think that running a ceiling fan while running the AC only stands to make it more effective, you’d also be wrong. Because modern AC units and homes are equipped with elaborate duct work and much more robust ventilation for even cooling, a ceiling fan only messes up the flow and prevents the cold air from making its way back to the air conditioner to be cooled and recirculated again. In this sense, an air conditioning unit can be likened to the human heart. It pumps out air to each room in the house, much like the heart pumps out blood to the extremities. Theoretically, if you turned on a fan in one of your extremities, the blood would be trapped and have a tough time making it back to the heart. The same can be said about the air in your house.

While ceiling fans may make air circulation less effective in modern homes, particularly ones with AC units installed in 2005 or later, ceiling fans in homes with air conditioners from 1995 or earlier are actually recommended to increase air flow. The bottom line, however, is that ceiling fans don’t improve an existing air conditioning units output or temperature, though some may enjoy the feeling they provide.

That depends on the configuration of your mini split AC also. I think you have found your answer till now but when I was confused with the same situation, I took help of the commercial air conditioning service NJ professionals. Asked my query online and they helped me a lot even they visited my home and did the whole HVAC inspection.

Ceiling fans are like open fireplaces. Unless you have a potbelly stove or other high delta t heating device that causes temperature stratification layers, it's an outdated, very inefficient, human comfort device. 

If you have them and must use them, only use them when you are present. Recognize that they add heat while cooling humans through accelerated evaporation. 

I've removed all the cords from mine, they tend to get left on in unoccupied rooms for days at a time.

RSS

Latest Activity

Tyson Pischel commented on David Byrnes's blog post Why Phoenix Is Called "The Land Of No Return"
"Couple of thoughts. Building in the size range of 1,800-2,000 sq ft, we have one return in the main…"
4 hours ago
Profile IconChris Dowis, Tyson Pischel, Megan Tunon and 1 more joined Home Energy Pros Forum
5 hours ago
Walter Ahlgrim commented on David Byrnes's blog post Why Phoenix Is Called "The Land Of No Return"
"I do not understand your sizing chart you say “22” return on a 5 ton AC unit” is…"
8 hours ago
Walter Ahlgrim commented on David Byrnes's blog post Why Phoenix Is Called "The Land Of No Return"
"I do not understand your sizing chart you say “22” return on a 5 ton AC unit” is…"
8 hours ago
Building Performance Institute liked Diane Chojnowski's video
10 hours ago
Building Performance Institute liked Diane Chojnowski's video
10 hours ago
Jan Green commented on David Byrnes's blog post Why Phoenix Is Called "The Land Of No Return"
"David:  Actually, over 70,000 moved to Phoenix last year alone.  We will be back up to…"
10 hours ago
Mark Furst commented on David Byrnes's blog post Why Phoenix Is Called "The Land Of No Return"
"Good stuff."
10 hours ago

© 2019   Created by Building Performance Association   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service