How To Choose The Best Smart Smoke Alarm

Although old-fashioned smoke detectors have functioned as a wine warning system for decades, they can be somewhat annoying with the potential for false alarms and low-battery chirping. The addition of smart smoke alarms to your home can add to your safety and peace of mind (by sending you a remote notification if something goes wrong). It all comes gown, however, to choosing the right device for your home and your needs.

Device Categories


The similarities between the following smart smoke alarms all revolve around one primary function – if the detector sounds, you will receive a push notification on your phone, whether you’re at home or away. How the devices do this, other functions they perform, how much they cost, and how many you can cover with a single device will vary widely. There are three main device categories; we have taken a closer look at them below:

• Smart Detectors


The most obvious way to add some smarts to your device is to replace it entirely with a version that connects to the internet. A number of manufacturers are currently offering such alarms with more set to enter the market soon. Expect to pay $100 or more per device you want to swap, but keep in mind that you’ll also receive conveniences like bring able to silence false alarms and notifications when batteries are low.

Most of the devices on the market use photoelectric sensors (which are more expensive than traditional ionised ones). The function of the more expensive sensor does, however, help to justify its cost – they are less prone to false alarms than their ionised counterparts.

• Listeners


Plug one of these devices into your wall and it will listen for the specific frequency of a smoke detector’s alarm, sending you an alert when it hears something. Since these sorts of devices don’t talk directly to the detectors, they won’t be any help in mitigating some of the common annoyances. You will start to see cost advantages if you have a large home and are interested in complete connected coverage.

Most of the devices on the market are able to cover a single floor without much difficulty, but if you have a large and sprawling house you might want to consider multiple units per floor. Some even come with a night light function, which is a handy bonus.

• Smart Batteries


These devices are relatively new to the market so there aren’t as many options available yet. They look and act like a 9V, connect to your WiFi network and sit inside your smoke detector (just like any other battery). How it differs to normal batteries is that you will receive a notification when the alarm sounds and when the battery starts to run low. If the detector only runs on battery power, you’ll also be able to silence it.

As with any other category in the smart home, it is recommended that you start small with smoke alarms and work your way up once you’ve found a device you like. Think about the size of your home when picking a device category for smart detection. Having a plan in place can help you to smoothly expand from a single device once you’ve determined that it’s right for you, even if multiple units are required to provide you with whole home coverage.

We hope that the information provided above has given you a much better idea of how to choose the best smoke detector installation for your home and needs. Many homeowners are surprised to learn that there is actually more than one type of device category, which provides ample possibilities for monitoring the home. If you have any questions or concerns, ensure that you speak with your electrician to determine what they would recommend.

Views: 74

Tags: Detectors, Smart, alarms, smart, smoke

Comments are closed for this blog post

Forum Discussions

Blower door test for small apartment building

Started by Jerry Needham in General Forum. Last reply by John White on Friday. 9 Replies

ENERGY STAR Version 3

Started by Allison A. Bailes III in General Forum. Last reply by Franco Oyuela on Thursday. 9 Replies

Radiant Barrier Southeast

Started by Gary Wright in Best Practices. Last reply by yassin chahdi on Thursday. 6 Replies

Latest Activity

Brett Little posted a discussion

How to become a Certified GreenHome Professional - Free Webinar!

The Certified GreenHome Professional (CGHP) training is a way to learn about the basics of…See More
18 hours ago
Corbett Lunsford's video was featured

Testing Air Quality with Your Nose: Control Your HOMEChem

Charlie Weschler sits down with Grace and Corbett and gives fascinating examples of the complexity of indoor air chemistry. He is an air quality legend, a professor on three continents, and a super nice guy.
Friday
Profile Iconwallace van, Tony kroos and Sunmar Construction, Inc joined Home Energy Pros Forum
Friday
John White replied to Jerry Needham's discussion Blower door test for small apartment building
"Well, I think it completely depends on the purpose and requirement of the test. Testing one unit in…"
Friday
John Nicholas replied to Jerry Needham's discussion Blower door test for small apartment building
"I can use my Duct Blaster on any house that I expect to be less than 1300 CFM through the…"
Friday
Sean Lintow Sr replied to Jerry Needham's discussion Blower door test for small apartment building
"FYI, he is in Illinois where code is 5 (well up until March as noted when it drops to 4)  Heh…"
Friday
John Nicholas replied to Jerry Needham's discussion Blower door test for small apartment building
"Here are two pictures of the duct blaster fan as a blower door.  1 in a door and 1 in a…"
Thursday
John Nicholas replied to Jerry Needham's discussion Blower door test for small apartment building
"What standard are you testing to? Energy Star requires 5 ACH @ 50.   Code is 3.0 etc…"
Thursday
John Nicholas replied to Jerry Needham's discussion Blower door test for small apartment building
"What standard are you testing to? Energy Star requires 5 ACH @ 50.   Code is 3.0 etc…"
Thursday
Franco Oyuela replied to Allison A. Bailes III's discussion ENERGY STAR Version 3
"The ENERGY STARnew homes program has been around since the mid-1990s and is currently undergoing…"
Thursday
Blake Reid commented on Blake Reid's blog post Managing Mold & Humidity (in Hawaii)
"Thank you very much! They're actually the same, though - the one with the dehu cover photo has…"
Thursday
John Proctor commented on Blake Reid's blog post Managing Mold & Humidity (in Hawaii)
"Nice post -- much better than the one that only showed the dehumidifier."
Thursday
Brett Little updated an event
Thumbnail

Full Circle Urban Forestry: Introducing Urban Wood Opportunities - Free CE Webinar at Webinar Online

December 5, 2018 from 12pm to 1:15pm
Many common urban tree removal practices in the United States view felled urban trees as costly…See More
Thursday
Brett Little replied to Brett Little's discussion Virtual CEU Tour of the Pembroke Passive Solar Zero Energy Ready Home
"You know utilities are pretty complex, especially in IL, however it looks like just about 6.8 cents…"
Thursday
yassin chahdi replied to Gary Wright's discussion Radiant Barrier Southeast
"It’s hard to choose on of these as most of the time the reviews and buying guides found on…"
Thursday
Bruce Fillmore replied to Mark Furst's discussion Bath fan weirdness
"In my opinion venting into any soffit is a bad idea, it usually requires a sharp bend to get into…"
Thursday
Tray Biasiolli replied to Mark Furst's discussion Bath fan weirdness
"I'd agree with Sean - we get wind effects regularly when measuring ventilation fan intake at…"
Thursday
Charles Buell replied to Mark Furst's discussion Bath fan weirdness
"You would have to test the vent at the inside at a location the same diameter as the outside…"
Thursday
Blake Reid's blog post was featured

Managing Mold & Humidity (in Hawaii)

A blower door measures how tight a house isAir sealing done as part of the install, and after…See More
Thursday
John White replied to Cameron Home Insulation's discussion Why is Air Sealing Important?
"Most attics have insulation which helps reduce heat loss. But it won't stop the air flow.…"
Wednesday

Photos

  • Add Photos
  • View All

© 2018   Created by Home Performance Coalition (HPC)   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service