How Changing Temps Affect Your Home’s Windows

In Colorado, there’s a time-honored saying:

“If you don’t like the weather, just wait a few minutes… it’ll change.”

And that’s amusing to many… but to those of us who’ve lived here for many years, it’s funny because it’s true.

It is not uncommon in Colorado for the temperature to change drastically… and quickly.  Not only can the high temperature be different by twenty or thirty degrees (or more) from one day to the next – it’s not unheard-of for the temperature to change by twenty degrees in a matter of hours.

Or even minutes.

So how do rapidly-changing temperatures affect the windows in your Colorado home?

It’s All About Pressure

Each of your windows most-likely features an insulating glass unit, which means the window consists of at least two glass panes, separated by solid “spacers,” and sealed at the edges.  Between the panes is air, or in many cases, a “noble gas” such as argon or krypton.

The purpose of these double-paned (or triple-paned) windows is to keep your home cooler in the summer, and warmer in the winter.  That pocket of air between the panes serves as effective insulation, keeping air from flowing in and out, but allowing the sunlight to shine through.

But when the temperature changes, pressure is created on that insulating glass unit.

A single-degree temperature change amounts to an increase in pressure of about three and a half pounds per square inch.

Not much, right?

But when the temperature changes drastically – and quickly – that pressure change can be significant.

In Colorado, where it’s not uncommon for the temperature to change by twenty degrees in a relatively short period of time, that climate change could equate to the pressure of a 175-mph wind.

That’s equal to a Class V hurricane!

What To Do About It

To begin with, you want to make sure your windows are made to withstand the kind of extreme temperature changes typical to our Colorado climate.

That means they need to be designed and manufactured in Colorado.

Luckily, one Colorado manufacturer – Amerimax – understands the pressures exerted on your replacement windows by our Rocky Mountain climate.

Amerimax was the first manufacturer of high-quality replacement windows to switch to no-metal “spacers” between insulating panes… minimizing the risk of glass fracture due to the extreme pressure exerted by rapid temperature changes.

And those spacers do more than allow for the natural expansion and contraction of your glass window panes due to temperature fluctuations… they also dramatically improve your windows’ thermal properties.

So your replacement windows’ insulating glass retains far more insulating value than windows produced with standard metal spacers.

Amerimax replacement windows are best for your Colorado home… because they’re made in Colorado.  Windows from lower altitudes simply will not perform as well here at our local altitude – and in our local climate.

Only Colorado replacement windows can stand up to the pressure of Colorado’s climate.  When it’s time to replace the windows in your Rocky Mountain home, call the local professionals, and insist on windows made locally.  You’ll be glad you did.

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Tags: amerimax, colorado, denver, replacement, vinyl, windows

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