Where to find jobs in energy efficiency

Here’s something you don’t hear people complain about much these days: worker shortages.  That is, unless you’re in energy efficiency, an industry that is booming as others are busting.

Sixty percent of those responding to a recent survey by the Association of Energy Services Professionals cited a lack of talented workers in energy efficiency.

“Energy efficiency is a rapidly growing segment of the overall energy industry and we believe there is a clear lack of talent that is necessary to fill the positions that are open,” said Meg Matt, the AESP president and CEO.

So where do you find these jobs?

Another recent report, this one by the Brookings Institution and Battelle’s Technology Partnership, sheds some light. Look to major metropolitan areas and young businesses for jobs not only in energy efficiency, but also in other segments of the clean economy, according to Sizing the Clean Economy: A National and Regional Green Jobs Assess....

In the midst of the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, the clean economy expanded by 8.3 percent, says the report. Efficiency, renewable energy, biofuels and other clean industries accounted for 2.7 million US jobs in 2010. To put that number in perspective, that’s more jobs than you’ll find in fossil fuels or biosciences, but still less than information technology.

Green jobs in general, and green construction in particular, were clustered in 100 large metropolitan areas. About 73 percent of the nation’s LEED certified green buildings are in these cities. Raleigh and Seattle have strong green architecture and building sectors. The energy saving/ building materials industry is thriving in Houston and Minneapolis. Boston excels in HVAC and building control systems, according to the Brookings/Battelle report.

The findings are in keeping with U.S. economic geography. The 100 largest metropolitan areas “are the nation’s innovation engines,” responsible for 78 percent of the US’ green patents. Further, most of the “highest-impact” U.S. cleantech firms called out in the 2010 Global Cleantech 100 list are based in these cities, particularly Boston, San Francisco, San Jose, and Los Angeles, said the report. In all, the100 biggest cities created three-quarters of the clean economy jobs from 2003 to 2010.

“In short, metropolitan areas, large and small, are now and will increasingly be the nation’s critical centers of clean economy talent, innovation, and finance and so its top hubs of commercialization, deployment, and trade,” the report said. “Regions and metropolitan areas, in short, are not a part of the national clean economy; they are that economy.”

Looking at broader regions, it’s not surprising to find California and the West responsible for the most clean economy jobs, when measured as a percentage of total employment. About 2.2 percent of the jobs in the West are related to the clean economy. The Northeast comes in second at 2.1 percent, followed by the Midwest’s 2 percent and the South’s 1.8 percent.

What kinds of businesses produce clean economy jobs? The young upstarts – or at least they’re responsible for the recent mercurial job growth.

Here’s how Brooking/Battelle explained this phenomenon. “Old establishments in the clean economy (those born before 2003) created an average of just three jobs for every one establishment from 2003 to 2010 while new establishments created 37 jobs. This compares favorably to new establishments nationally which created just 10 jobs per establishment over the same period.”

How much do these jobs pay? Quite a bit.

Brooking/Battelle found that clean economy jobs pay about 13 percent more than typical US jobs, and have a median wage of $44,000. AESP said 80 percent of those who responded to its survey cited vacant jobs in energy efficiency with salaries of $50,000 to $100,000 and 28 percent said jobs were untaken at salaries of $100,000 to $150,000.

So spread the word. Not all the economic news is gloom and doom. Energy efficiency and the clean economy are hiring.

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Comment by Coby Rudolph on August 8, 2011 at 12:56pm
Efficiency First has a Home Performance Job Board that may be helpful for people searching for / posting jobs: http://jobs.efficiencyfirst.org
Comment by Dave Summers on July 26, 2011 at 1:33pm
We are booming in Colorado.  Small business energy efficiency retrofit projects are at an all time high.  We are hiring and looking to expand rapidly.  www.ecosyste.ms is the first step for small businesses to start saving money and so far from what i've seen, there is a lot to be saved and made.
Comment by Paul Lasicki on July 25, 2011 at 12:10pm
I agree with Craig, the only ones making money is BPI, CSG, and all the training associates. While working for an energy conservation company full time I made in a week what I used to make in a day and half 5 years ago. Also my own business has been bleeding for the last 2 - 3 years. Business is not booming!
Comment by William H Nickerson on July 21, 2011 at 5:45pm
I challege those numbers too.If office workers are telling brookings they have a green job because its cheak,thats what you get.I see green builders going under,sustainable retailers closing shop and only the educational sector making any money.That must be it,put LEED after your name and sell plastic spoons..yea thats it,plastic spoons.
Comment by Craig Lill on July 21, 2011 at 1:02pm
The only jobs out there for BPI Analyst's  are as door and window salesmen. Just above minimum wage, plus some commission, as a independent contractor and have own equipment. No real knowledge needed, just make the scope of work as big as possible. The only companies doing any business are the ones that are doing the training and the companies who have the state contracts to oversee the programs. I haven't seen anyone offering $44,000.00 a year. Local contractors aren't going to change until mandated to, ( I build a good house, a house has to breathe.) Many still using tar paper. Can't move, still no job.
Comment by Jim Peck on July 18, 2011 at 5:10pm

I try and hiring all the time.

It's wicked hard.

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