This is a tricky one to google because "remote" is overshadowed by remote control apps for things like Nest thermostats.

My problem is this: the builders of my house wired the thermostat for the upstairs zone at the top of the stairs where the heat from the downstairs rises up and tricks it into thinking the whole zone is warm.  Moving the wires into the only bedroom upstairs, where the thermostat should have been all along, is cost prohibitive.


Is there a way to replace the old-fashioned wired thermostat with a digital wired thermostat that can be wirelessly controlled by a remote temperature sensor in the bedroom?  This would allow me to save energy by handling things in a more sensible manner than my current routine of trying to trick the thermostats into doing what I want.

Thanks you for any info on this you can provide.

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Some of the high end Honeywells offer that feature. What you are looking for is a wireless remote sensor. The thermostat will stay in it's current location and the wires sensor will be installed in eh room you wish to monitor.

Look into the Honeywell Redlink thermostats. Equipment module connects to furnace and wireless thermostat can be installed anywhere you like. Spendy, but if it's cheaper than pulling a new wire...

http://www.pexsupply.com/Honeywell-YTH6320R1001-Wireless-FocusPro-P...

Some thermostats also allow adding multiple sensors and then averaging them.  Any sensor you add must come from the maker of the existing thermostat.  You generally can not mix sensors.

You may want to look at NEST,  I believe they have remotes.

I've not seen them or heard of them, but they could be out there.

I can help you with this...message or email me

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